Club Information

Welcome to the Rotary Club of Numurkah website. Here you will be able to learn more about our dynamic Rotary Club.

Numurkah

Service Above Self

We meet Mondays at 6:30 PM
Numurkah Golf & Bowls Club
Tunnock Road
Numurkah, VIC  3636
Australia
DistrictSiteIcon
District Site
LatestPublishedBulletin
Bulletins
VenueMap
Venue Map
 
Home Page Stories

Guest speaker – John Taylor, Director of Taylor & Whitty, Solicitors. John holds a Bachelor of Arts & Law degree. John has 30 years of experience in all aspects of law.

Born in Finley, son of a lawyer.

Discussion Wills & Powers of Attorney.

A Will is a document that only has effect after you die. You appoint executors to carry out your intent as defined in the will, together with Guardians & beneficiaries. Binding nominations are often referred to with superannuation & insurance companies and can override details in a will. Joint proprietors & tenants in common – different terms when purchasing property. Joint proprietors the interest automatically passes to the survivor, whereas tenants in common share the property.

If a will is challenged when one is defending a claim on an estate, the costs are generally awarded against the party that is unsuccessful in the claim.

Generally Executors are usually family members, whereas if State Trustees are appointed there are fees involved, often Executors think they should be paid to carry out their role to carry out the wishes of the testator.

By listing someone as a Power of Attorney you are primarily giving people power to make financial & personal decisions for you, whereas the appointment of a medical treatment decision maker you are appointing someone to make decisions regarding life support. It is a powerful document where you are giving power to someone to act as you, purchasing property etc. They can have a limiting effect or total effect in the event that you develop mental issues or physical issues, if there is no power of attorney people are required to apply for guardianship which can be expensive. The most bitter cases John has worked on are estates, where litigation chews up all the funds in an estate and can fragment families.

 
 
 
Alastair Wittington guest speaker at club meeting.
Spent two years working on a dairy farm in Saudi Arabia.
Flew to Canberra to obtain visa, told could take 6 months, but returned in 2 hours and received visa.
Flew to Singapore then Riyadh, greeted by a temperature of 54 degrees at airport. One and a half hours travel to reach dairy farm.
10 milking units each with 2,500 cows, a total of 25,000 on farm
Staffing mainly third world countries, Pakistani, Nepalese and some from Philippines, a total of 4,500.
Management of 30 mainly from Australia, New Zealand Britian, oversaw the operation and running.
Fully integrated farm with milk processed on the farm.
Arrived in April 1989 and was assistant supervisor on one of the dairy units. Moved to young stock unit.
Production 45 litres per day from each cow.
In august 1990 commencement of Gulf War where "Desert Shield" turned into "Desert Storm" in July 1991.
Hence the "I've been scudded in Riyadh" on shirt.

 

Neville Atkinson Indigenous Facilitator with the Catchment Management Authority spoke to the club about Aboriginal framework in the Goulburn Valley.

Rumbalara Co-op established in 1959 as a site for housing Aboriginal people. Policy of the Government of the time to relocate Aboriginal people, not just Yorta Yorta people.

1968 Sir Douglas Nicholls (uncle) led social and economic inclusion, driving away from welfare and benevolence.

Rumbalara now provides community services, looking after the needs of Aboriginal people.

Yorta Yorta Nation driving quality of inclusion and respect to first nation people.

Need to start practising responsibility with expectation for people to manage own affairs and have better relationships with wider community.

Personally works with CMA as Indigenous Facilitator and in spare time pursues economic development with private and business sector for Aboriginal people.


 
 
Despite the weather a very successful trip enjoyed by all 34 participants to Buckland Valley on weekend of 13-15th April.
Some of Joan Barkers photos capturing the sceneary and spirit of the 4WD Trip.
All Joan's photos will be posted to Photo Album.
 

 
 
 
 
 

Jen Parer from Rotary Club of Holbrook spoke to the club on "RAM" Rotarians Against Malaria.

Malaria is still endemic in 91 countries.

Chronic malaria causes poverty and poor education.

Estimates there are over 210 million cases annually with 445,000 deaths reported last year (65% of all deaths are children under five).

Anopheles mosquito bites infect people and spread malaria rapidly through communities.

How to interrupt cycle:

1. Person focused control - preventive therapies.

2. Vector (mosquito) control - healthy villages, bed nets, spraying.

3. Development such as better housing and water.

RAM Programs:

  • Chasing Malaria in PNG - testing, treating, prevention.
  • Bed Net Distribution - insecticide treated bed nets.
  • Healthy Villages - equip villages with tools.
  • Support vaccine development.
  • Support a PhD student.

 Malaria Awareness Day 30th April

 
 
 
As an introduction to the guest speaker, chairman Geoff Stewart spoke about polio.
Polio is an infectious disease causing permanent muscle weakness, paralysis, and in sever cases, can be life-threatening..
In 1979, RI launched a 5 year polio immunization project.
Polio Plus has reduced the number of cases from 350,000 annually to fewer than 400 in 2014, and 22 in 2017.
 
Sue the daughter of Audrey Hendy, shared her mother's polio story.
At the age of 30 with a 3 year old child and pregnant, stricken down with polio. Spent 9 months in an isolation ward at Mooroopna Hospital, discharged with calipers to both hips. Told she would not walk again.
Moved to Melbourne and lived with her sister for 18 months.
Audrey lived an amazing life, but 20 years ago suffered Post Polio Syndrome, which is a recurrence of symptoms usually 30-40 years after an initial episode pf polio. The symptoms include general tiredness, as well as weakness and pain affecting the muscles, and often coupled with depression.
Long journey - but lived life to fullest.

 
 
The Rotary Club of Numurkah sponsored debating team from St Mary of the Angels competed in the grand final debate against Albury at the District Conference and were named runners up.
A superb job by the team Jesica Camm, Ayla Armstrong, Riley Wilson and coach June Hando.
 

 
Club Members Friends and Guests visited Katunga Fresh for a tour with Peter van den Goor.
 
 
FRANK MALCOLM described his early days which could be called "Malcolm's World Of Pain"
Born in Sale, father a dairy farmer. At the age of 9 moved to Melbourne and was educated in Melbourne.
Commenced work with Telstra, married Pam and have 5 sons and a daughter.
Back to Sale with Telstra as a supervisor, then Warrugul.
Spent next 14 years on a dairy farm in Leongatha, recounting several accidents. Property had a sawmill on it involving further accident mishaps.
Then moved to a dairy farm in Naring.
 
JENNIFER RODGER: Jennifer took long service leave and drove around Australia in her motor-home travelling 26,000 km in six months.
Jennifer showed pictures of her courageous adventure.
Different lifestyle, meeting people doing the same thing.
 
TERRY BRENNAN: Born in Numurkah, educated at St Josephs Primary School and Numurkah High School, leaving school at 14 tears old.
Became a apprentice motor mechanic at Hurrens Motors working there for 7 years before buying own business. Considered on-farm work, but did not eventuate.
Married Pam and has raised 2 girls and 3 boys.
Joined Rotary in 1975. Rotary taught him alot.
After 15 years working in own backyard bought a propertry opposite across the road.
After 49 years sold business and retired,
 

 
38th Annual Art & Craft Exhibition
A high quality show is how the art judge described the 38th Annual Art & Craft Exhibition staged by the Rotary Club of Numurkah in the Numurkah Town Hall over the weekend.
In welcoming those attending the official opening on Friday night, president of the Rotary Club Jacque Phillips said The Art & Craft Show brings together the community giving us the opportunity to appreciate art and craft created by artists from near and far.
Susannah Sheed MP officially opened the exhibition stating “The value of art to community cannot be understated. It can entertain us, challenge us, it can move us, it can inspire us. It is a record of who we are at a point in time, and – often – it is a signal of who we want to be”.
Art judge Ted Dansey selected Ross Paterson’s “Summer Morning – Sheans Creek” as The Best in Show. Ted commented “The painting shows the artists great affinity with the subject – coupled with sound technique and a quality that only comes from spending thousands of hours at the easel and a driving passion to paint”.
Runner Up was “Trash and Treasure” by Barbara Beasley-Southgate from Lilydale. “Has all the things a judge looks for in a painting – technique, design, colour, tones etc.”.
Best Watercolour was awarded to “Bonding” by Joel Magpayo from Delahey. “Shows a great use of the medium, use of colour and tone, and has good clarity”.
Best Oil was “Violin Romance” by Lorraine Lewitzka from Victor Harbour. “This painting has good design and technique and, importantly, shows honesty and feeling”.
Best Pastel “The Lilypond” by Nancy Thurlby from Glen Iris. “This painting shows the artist feeling for the subject combined with her abilities in technique, design and colour sensitivity”.
Best Pencil “Seated Nude:” by Richard Stork from Baranduda. “An unusual and brave composition. Shows good drawing skills and quality rendering”.
Best Regional Artist: Glenda Cornell from Kyabram. “The strong colours compliment the abstractness of the work”.
Moira Art & Culture Inc. Encouragement Award was “Couleur Rougeoyante en R’esine” by Janet Tett. “Good design and use of mixed media”.
Craft Judge Claire Reid commented on the variety of entries making a great display.
Fibres Threads and Beads
Winner: Valerie Pendlebury “Tenerife Lace”
Highly Commended  No 485 Dianne Schmidt –Turner “Behind the Mask 5”
Framed Needlework Award
Winner: Debbie Seen. “Walter”
 Highly Commended  Lyn Jones “Shearing the Rams”

Quilt Award
 Winner: Fiona Carruthers “Claire’s Flower Garden”
Highly Commended  Vikki Le Quesne “Affairs Of The Heart”
Art Quilt Award
Winner: Therese Cossens “Finke Desert Race”
Craft Award Section A
Winner: Margaret Blackburn “Red Childs Jumper”
Highly Commended Fiona Carruthers “Nuts About Ice”
                                     Fiona Carruthers “Waves of Fire and Ice”
Craft Award Section B
Winner: David Jackson  “Pepper grinder” (made from an old house stump)
Cushions
Winner: Pam Brennan “Shades of Grey”
Highly Commended Therese Cossens “Twin Chevrons”
The exhibition was well attended over the weekend with excellent sales.
Raffle winner: L. Boyd.
Peoples Choice: "Celeste" Ben Winspear.
 
 

 Louisa Li a dietitian at Numurkah District Health Service spoke to members about back to basics guide to healthy eating.

Main groups: Vegetables: Use at least three different coloured vegetables per meal. This will provide a wider range of nutrients. Have at least one serve of green vegetables daily for folate.

Protein foods: To meet nutrient needs, have different protein foods at lunch and dinner including 3 -4 red meat meals per week for iron and zince and 2 fish meals per week for omega-3

Carbohydrate foods: Get your dietary fibre from a variety if carbohydrate foods. Legumes twice a week important for gut health. Wholegrain, high fibre and lower GI foods. If using white pasta and rice for dinner, choose wholegrain, high fibre or lower GI choices for breakfast and lunch.

Portion size according to age and gender.

 

 
 
President Jacque inducted Kay Moodie, Chris & Ross Hardman into the Rotary club.
Pictured President Jacqie Phillip, membership director and sponsor Kate Hodge, Kay Moodie, Chris & Ross Hardman and Stephen Mills sponsor.
 
 
 
 
Trinity & Mariea were city folk in the hotel business when wanting a change in 1980 found land at Bearii with growing possibilities. Land had one tree on it, thus the Scotch name "Aintree Farm"
Established orchard planting 200 almond trees, then later a further 2000. Computerised irrigation system installed which registers soil moisture content and waters to trees by drip irrigation, water required.
Almond trees need cross pollination and required hiring bee hives. Because of cost, established own hives to be used in orchard and also hired out, and became an aviarist.
Diversified by planting 700 olive trees.
Almonds and olives harvested with a converted harvester with almonds sent to SA for cracking, due to transport costs bought own cracking machine.
Established value added products which are sold on the orchard, through speciality shops and markets.
Considering retirement but had second thoughts and diversified again by growing hemp.
Trinity concluded by saying "Diversification has meant survival".
 

 
 
Peter Sprunt and Kerry Swan, members of the Numurkah Floodplain Community Reference Group spoke to the club.
Peter born in Kaarimba, educated in Numurkah now on a dairy farm in Katunga spoke with passion on the flood mitigation options.
Moira Shire relatively flat country with Numurkah the bottle neck in Moira Shire during the 2012 floods.
Usually takes 4 days for flood waters to arrive from Katamatite, in 2012 it took 24 hours, taking 10 days to subside. Local knowledge was bypassed by authorities.
Numurkah Flood Action Group formed by concerned citizens.
After 5 years modelling a Floodplain Management report has been published with three options for community consultation.
Public meeting March 1st in Numurkah Town Hall planned. Politicians will be present. The meeting will gauage the community response.
Peter stressed this is the only chance to do something - community must drive, otherwise nothing will happen.
Peter spoke to Option A, with minimal impact outside levee giving security to those inside levee.
Open day on Sunday at Visitor Information Centre.
Submissions can be lodged with Moira Shire before option decided.
 

 
 
Debbie Oliver principal of Numurkah Primary School.
Born in Nagambie, family sheep farmers, educated at St Josephs School Nagambie, Sacred Heart Seymour then Technical School in Seymour.
Avid reader, believing reading and literacy key to life.
After graduating deferred 12 months working as a clerk in Taxation Office.
Entered Rusden College graduating with a Batchelor of Education.
First posting to Goroke for 2 years, then Mooroopna Secondary College followed as Assistant Principal at Shepparton High School.
At Numurkah Primary aim to lift literacy and numeracy standards as well as social skills. Passionate in building leadership skills in teachers as well as students.
Numurkah Primary a vibrant school where students want to learn and be ready for transition to High School.
Debbie still passionate and enjoys teaching.

 
 
 
 
 
Stephen Mills updated members on the Soldier Settlement Project.
Aim to install a 2.5 metre map on the NAB south wall and  turning walkway into a history walk.
The map will have each farm numbered with name of settler underneath.
Consulting community members to verify information with all approached willing to share information.
Research led to several maps State Rivers, Moira Shire and G.V. Water.
Numurkah Historical Society booklet, and Nathalia "Blockies" booklet as well as memorials in Nathalia, Katunga and Yarroweyah providing useful information.
Soldier Settlers had to qualify on a point system, aim to gain 100 points.
War Service 20 points, Farm Experience 30 points, Personal Attributes 30 points, Evidence of Thrift 10 points, Marital Status 10 points, and attend an interview.
Hoping to make a joint project with Historical Society and RSL.
Six soldier settlers still alive.
 

 
Gary & Barb. Duke were guest speakers at club meeting Monday 29th January.
 
Gary and Barb Duke combine their love of cycling, both locally and internationally with humanitarian work. Travel on a tandem bike with trailer.
Visited the highlands of New Guinea to assist with rebuilding of the hospital. Locals are easy going, lovely people but tribal system prevails. Gary found that dealing with them you had to be strong and firm.
Hospital staffed by doctors is the main training hospital for remote areas. Student doctors choose to come to make a difference.
Naracoorte Rotary Club financed installation of water tanks and visited and worked hard.
Gary & Barb looking to do something, to be a help over longer period without being burdensome to others.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Lauren a St Mary's student gave a passionate account of her alternate schoolies week in the Philippines.
One of 6 students from St Mary's, Lauren travelled to the Philippines on an immersion program visiting and assisting at housing projects and orphanages.
Difference between Australia and Philippines is that they have no social security.
Big impact was meeting people, always happy and smiling, making the most of what they have. This experience did not make Lauren happy with situation and challenged her to look at situation of fellow human beings.
Heartfelt experience was joining Brother Paul on his nightly visits to women on the street. A humble man, trusted by the women as he handed out medical supplies, condoms and comfort.
Trip impacted on Lauren's future. She was considering entering nursing, now she can not wait to pursue her goal of nursing and return with these skills.
Lauren was grateful she was able to contribute to the situation, thanking Rotary for their contribution.
 
 
 
The annual first meeting of the year was a combined BBQ with the Lions Club & partners in Apex Park.
An enjoyable meal with good fellowship commenced the year on a high note for the new year.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

 


 
 

 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
LAUREN HARRIS:

Year 12 student at St Mary of the Angels undertaking an "Alternative Schoolies" trip to Philippines.

One of 6 students from St Marys will travel to the Philippines on 3rd December returning on 13th December, Students raised $3780 to be distributed in Philippines to organisations such as orphanages, day-care centre and schools. 

A two way experience with lots to learn and appreciate. Lauren always wanted to go on this trip, feeling a duty to contribute and help our neighbours by improving poverty and lifestyle. Lauren concluded by thanking the Rotary Club for its sponsorship of the trip.

 

AMIE HODGE & TIM CONNOLLY:

Amie & Tim thanked the Rotary Club for sponsorship to attend the Rotary Youth Leadership Award (RYLA) camp at Malmsbury which was a rewarding and life changing experience,

Focus on self improvement, development of leadership, communication skills and project management.

Challenged to find out who you are and what you can be, Week long camp included ice-breaking games, boot camp, exercises, guest speakers.

Amie & Tim felt the camp was enriching and felt a clarity on their future.

 


 
 
Steve McKewen was guest speaker at meeting on Monday 20th,
 
Steve is District Membership Director.
Steve challenged the club members to think positively about membership.
Key to membership depends on your club, if not a fun club, people will no come along.
What do you like about Rotary, why are you not sharing it with others?
Do you tell people about Rotary? Why are you not proud to talk about Rotary?
Convince people it is better than doing something else - here has to be better.
Meetings must be good value, plan like a dinner party not a board meeting.
If you do not like meetings, consider change.
Rotary is a way to meet friends.
Fundraising good for community, but members must be happy to participate
Evaluate and discuss club, review and manage.

 
Hayley Napier was guest speaker at the clubs meeting on Monday 13th November.
 
A qualified allied health health professional specialising in delivery of exercises for the prevention and management of chronic disease and injury.
62% Australian adults overweight with 34% with high blood pressure.
Adults with BMI above 30 and physically inactive leads to risk factors.
50% Australians have a chronic disease of which 34% preventable.
What can we do? Quit smoking, limit alcohol, have a good social network, decrease stress, eat healthy diet and get enough sleep, and participate in physical activity or exercise.
How do I exercise? The F.I.T.T, principle.
Frequency: Eliminate sedentary behaviour where possible and aim to be active every day in as many ways as possible with at least 30 minutes of light to moderate intensity activity per day OR 15 minutes of vigorous intensity per day.
Intensity: Include muscle strengthening exercises.
Time: Develop a routine.
Type: Resistance exercise, aerobic or endurance exercise.
Progression to ensure that you are gradually challenging your body to become fitter.
When does it stop? Never. 
Movement is Life and Life is Movement.
Look at exercise as an opportunity no an inconvenience.
 
 
Rotary Club of Numurkah celebrated their 60th Anniversary on 28th October 2017.
 
 
 
 
Past Rt. Gerald Green reflected on the early days, Past Rtn Kevin Hansen recounted being an Exchange Student and AG Chris Sutton spoke on the club as it is today.
DG Bernie Bott presented a Paul Harris Fellow to Betty Seiter and an Outstanding Service Award to Sieg Seiter.
Clare West cut the 60th Anniversary cake.

 
Visiting Rotarian Ian Stronge and his wife Anne visiting from Tocumwal R.C to support guest speaker Bianca Phillips (granddaughter).
 
President Jacque reported on the great success of the Food bowl Festival on the weekend with great weather and crowds. Reminder of 60th Anniversary celebrations this coming weekend and the need for helpers.
 
Chairman Graham Hodge spoke about life being good, it is lonely at times but he lloks forward to Monday nights at Rotary and his garden is well tendered and watered.
 
Guest Speaker Bianca Phillips from Yallaba Adventurer Unit reported on the 31st Scout Jamboree to China and Mongolia in which the club part sponsored.
* There were 68 Scouts & 32 Leaders from 20 countries attend
* It was Bianca's first time travelling without her family
* First two days spent in China visiting the Great Wall and the Forbidden City
* Big climate change in Mongolia with high humidity and 'long drop' stench
* Most Mongolians still living in Ger's/Yerts
* The women wear bright colours, lots of animals wandering around freely, legal age of drinking alcohol was 10 yrs old and legal age of smoking was 13 yrs old.
* Bianca buried a blow up kangaroo on a Mongolian mountain
* The highlight/most enjoyable part of the trip was the friendships made and the people she shared the trip with.
* Bianca said that she would never forget the people, places and the atmosphere from the experience.
 
Reports
 
Stephen Mills
Christmas light has been approved $1000 from our club, $1000 from Lions & $500 from Bendigo Bank. Awaiting the Shire to approve appropriate materials
Visited Mens Shed and found it vibrant with 20 members. Mens Shed wanting ongoing support from Rotary and putting up two proposals fro a BBQ area and purchase of a storage shipping container. John Watson attending the AGM this Friday.
Steve keen to get a proposal up and running to update/improve strret stall area
 
Linda Boyd
Rotary supporting two nominees for RYLA for $1000 ea, Tim Connolly and Amy Hodge
 
Terry Brennan
Calendar sales were at Foodbowl 32, Pubs 52, Market 80. Having two stalls at Numurkah Show and looking for volunteers during the week. 60th Anniversary Dinner has 79 people coming needing volunteers.
 
Lorraine Greenwood
The club makes $5 from every $5 calendar sold. Potential for $10,000 to be made. Roster to be distributed around meeting.
 
Sieg Seiter
Needing two teams to go around local pubs on a Friday night
 
Squish Davis
Reported on her excitement aand sense of community over the weekend for Foodbowl Festival. Thank you to Rotary for support.
 
Julie Andrew
Reported on a a successful Umoja Orphanage Dinner last Monday night with over 120 guests, making approx $1400 for the project. A big thank you to all Rotarians.
 
Chris Sutton
Reporting as Assistant Govenor
Attended meeting for DG 2020/21
Looking for nominees
AGM will be 06/11/2017
Steve McKewen ( District Chair for Membership) coming to our club as guest speaker
District Conference has had Merv Hughes and another speaker pull out but have replaced with same calibre speakers
Bernie Bott asking Rotarians to do Movember for Mental Health
Noel Trevaskis fro Rotary International coming to Cobram RC, booking a table to support club that has supported us. Roster on Clubrunner.
 
Attendance 
Monday 16th October = 80%
Monday 23rd October = 63%
 
Heads and Tails
Ernest Jones
 
NO MEETING NEXT MONDAY 30th OCTOBER
 
At short notice a presentation from Julie, Kate and Stephen on their Umoja Orphanage visit, with photos taken by Stephen - some of 4,000 taken.
Stephen spoke on his impressions gained from the visit to Kenya.
Learnt that the need is great in Kenya, but with passionate people great things are being done at Umoja.
94% of donations to the orphanage makes it to on ground care.
Kenyan government agencies place children at Umoja, with majority of orphans having being sexually abused.
Jobs at orphanage included fencing, building cow shed, health clinics.
Assisted at Feeding Station, feeding 4,000 children with cooked maize, beans, rice, spinach.
Health clinics conducted by the 5 nurses in the group of 16. Kate and Julie noted an improvement in general health.
Spent 4 days in Rwanda for "Walk with the Gorillas". Visited genocide memorial, which was confronting.
Stephen concluded by saying although there for only 10 days, hopefully made a difference.
Julie added there was a vast improvement in health of villagers since last visit. Kate looked after the animals. Vegetable gardens doing well, with extra produce being sold to assist sustainability.
Built a shaded areas to enable year round crops.

 
 
With the assistance of laptop computers and facilities in President's Room arranged by Deb Fowler from Numurkah Learning Centre members had a hands on information session on Club Runner.
Lou presented a session on the club's website illustrating the wealth of details available for perusal and reference. The Members Only section was explained, illustrating the various functions, looking at members profiles, email communications, events plus details on the club's member age range, gender and service and inactive members.
 
Photo from last year's session.

 
 
Pip Cowan spoke to the club about his "Busking to Mississippi" trip, thanking the club for their support.
Departed early June arriving in Memphis the home of Elvis. Stayed a couple of days in Memphis, on the Mississippi in Tennessee.  Toured the Sun Studios used by Elvis.
Set up base in Clarksdale, the mecca for blues music
A cigar box guitar was made for and presented to Pip after following Pip's story on the internet.
Enrolled in a guitar workshop, which also had classes in piano, harmonica and recording.
Met some amazing characters, all die hard music enthusiasts such as Watermelon Slim and Deak Harp who set up a harmonica shop.
Not all plain sailing, but was a great experience for over a month learning about becoming a blues performer.
Pip showed photos and videos of his experience.
Would he do it again - Yes!

 
 
 

The Rotary Club hosted the Ian Murphy Memorial Debating Competition.

The debating competition was conceived by Rotarian Ian Murphy of the Rotary Club of Corryong and provides a platform for secondary school students in year 11 to develop debating skills by competing against other schools of District 9790.

The Rotary Club sponsor a team from St Mary of the Angels Secondary College, who in heat one defeated Notre Dame, and debated the topic "That sport should be compulsory in all schools" against a team from Marian College Myrtleford.

Adjudicators were David Geddes, John Watson from Numurkah and Bernard Soodyk from Myrtleford.

St Mary's debating the affirmative narrowly won in a close debate. St Mary's team was Jessica Kam,, Ayla Armstrong and Riley Wilson, supported by teacher Jabe Hando and several parents. The Marian College team was Erin Bourke, Alice Whitford, Louise Saric supported by Evan Jones and Vanessa Leonard from the Rotary Club of Myrtleford.

David Geddes in announcing the winner commented on the debaters. Jessica Kam opening for St Mary's clearly defined the topic, was precise and outlined the plan. Ayla Armstrong the second speaker started strong with good voice modulation. Riley Wilson challenged on rebuttal, summary was good and maintained good eye contact.

For Marian College Louise Saric concentrated too much on school and pre-school, outlined plan. Alice Whitford the second speaker had good voice modulation with good continuity. Erin the final speaker used the microphone the best, presentation excellent with debate well covered. David Geddes commented that all speakers from both teams tried to fit too much into the time they had.

Rotarian Jason Andrew, the chairman, concluded by thanking the students, teachers, parents and supporters in what was an excellent, and very positive debate.

St Mary's Ayla Armstrong, Riley Wilson, Jessica Kam and Jane Hando.

Marian College: Erin Bourke, Alice Whitford, Louise Saric with Wvan Jones and Vanesa Leonard from Rotary Club of Myrtleford.


 
 

Denice Robertson a member of the Shepparton & District Parkinson's Support Group spoke to Rotary.

Parkinson’s is a progressive neurological condition that affects people from all walks of life. It is quite common, with approximately 70,000 Australians living with Parkinson’s.

The average age of diagnosis is 65 years, however younger people can be diagnosed with Parkinson’s too. This is referred to as Young Onset Parkinson’s.

It is not easy to diagnose Parkinson’s. There are no laboratory tests (such as a blood test or brain scan), so it is important that the diagnosis is made by a specialist, such as a neurologist. The specialist will examine for any physical signs of Parkinson’s and take a detailed history of symptoms.

Currently there is no known cause of understanding of why a person develops Parkinson’s

The underlying cause of Parkinson’s symptoms relates to a decline in the production of a chemical in the brain called dopamine. Dopamine is an important chemical messenger, or neurotransmitter, that allows messages to be passed between cells in the brain. This lack of dopamine means people can have difficulty controlling their movements and moving freely and it can also impact on other body systems such as your sense of smell, bowel and your thinking and mood.

Parkinson’s is categorised by clinicians as a “movement disorder” and symptoms may include muscle rigidity, tremor, postural instability and bradykinesia (slowness of movement).  Many people think of tremor in Parkinsons but in around 30% of cases tremor is not present.

Symptoms of Parkinson’s usually develop slowly and gradually progress over time. Each person is affected differently and the rate of progression varies greatly between individuals.

Research being undertaken into bio-markers to identify possibility of developing Parkinsons. Volunteers over 50 without neurological problems and shoulder problems required. Appointments can be made with researchers visiting Shepparton on 4th October.


 

 
Don Kendall from Kendall Waste Collection was guest speaker.
Born in Canada, originally a commercial fisherman then worked with a transport company in western Canada. In 1977 made a commitment to come to Australia. In 1978 commenced building trailers for the transport company. Returned to Australia in 1987 commenced working for Tom Garrett in Shepparton. 
In 1993 started building own trucks. In 1993 founded Kendall Foote Waste, winning Moira Shire & Berrigan Shire contacts in 1998. In 2006 bought out Peter Foote in 2009 won Rubbish Recycling Service Award.
In 2011 son Josh joined business started from ground up, now run business with Don's daughter Erin.
2012 Moira Shire run a trial on organic collection and pioneered the introduction of this service.
Moira has lowest contamination rate of 0.4% in Victoria.
Remained competitive as build own equipment.

 
 
Kate and Julie returning to Umoja Orphanage Kenya with Steve Mills in a couple of weeks, provided an update since visit in 2015.
Fleming McLean Children's Home opened in 2016, housing 12 children with aim to build another house.
Children sourced by Kenyan Social Service.
Since visit in 2015, building a guard house, taken delivery of a van used for children's appointments and as a community ambulance.
New baby animals including calves, 300 baby chicks, goats and sheep.
Sustainability with new crops of produce. Australian vegetables introduced including pumpkins, spinach. capsicum and sweet corn
New jobs to be tackled on visit include new cow shed and dairy, fencing and irrigation for Steve.
Kate and Julie will tackle health clinics, animal husbandry, household chores, planting fruit trees and fencing.
This will be the 18th work party from Rotary in Australia.
Bonus trip flying to Rawanda, mini safari, looking for gorillas.
The opportunity to help the orphaned children of Kenya at the orphanage is the motivation to return.
 
 

 
 
 
 
Lorraine Greenwood stepped in as guest speaker as apology received from District Chair of Youth Exchange Bruce because of a family emergency.
Lorraine became involved in Youth Exchange through a fellow teacher Nigel Liggins, and is now coordinator of the Orientation Programs held throughout the year.
The objective of Youth Exchange is the promotion of international goodwill, peace and understanding.
It is not just a holiday, it broadens experience and develops personal growth through the opportunity to see things, try things and have fun.
Outbound students travelling overseas.
Inbound students from overseas.
Rebounds students who have returned.
Rotex students who have returned and assist with orientation program.
Orientation weekends assist outbound students to prepare for exchange, and fosters friendship and support for inbound students. Support in settling back after returning fron exchange is given to rebound students.
Inbound students attend a 10 day Mittagundi Camp, a real Aussie outback experience and a 21 day Rock to Reef Safari.
Six D's of Rotary Youth Exchange.
No dating, no drinking, no defacing, no drugs no driving and no downloading.
In concluding Lorraine stated Rotary Youth Exchange builds goodwill and international peace.

 
 
Jeff Blackley was guest speaker on Monday 14th August.
Jeff  recently retired as Principal at Numurkah Primary School, gave an excellent presentation of a trip he and his wife undertook 'Around the World in 80 Days"
Commencing in South America on an organised tour visited Brazil, Peru keen to develop tourist industry.
Santiago, Chile feature Spanish influence in its architecture.
Buenos Aires, Argentina French style.
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, shanty towns had a real community spirit.
Iguazu Falls (Brazil & Argentina) 2.7km of water falls,
Lima, Peru Spanish influence, with rural areas keeping original native skills.
Macu Picchu, Peru, original capital of Inca Empire
Galapagos Islands cruise visited the islands and explored the wild life.
Cruise and road trip through Canada, then road trip along Route 66 in America.
Finished tour in Scandanavia.
Most eye-opening moments: Roasted guinea pigs, chicken legs and pig heads.
Most memorable meaningless highlight: Cadillac Ranch, Texas.

 

Peter Chisnall was guest speaker on Monday 7th August.

Peter gave an interesting and engaging story of his life.

"Kid from Corowa" with football and boxing interests, spending most of his life in training.

Father was a peoples person with a knack of relating and engaging young people, other influences in his youth, Frank Tuck ex Collingwood player, John Hoyle ex Footscray and Fred Swift ex Richmond Football Club.

In 1968 invited to North Melbourne Football Club as Ovens & Murray zoned to North Melbourne. First game played against the great Ted Whitten, second game against Essendon, third game against Fitzroy.

Invited back to Corowa for a year with promise to support him in Melbourne the following year.

Played in premiership team.

Returned in 1969 to North Melbourne, spent two years with Sandringham in VFA. In 1973 Ron Barasi took over as coach at North Melbourne and brought about a culture change seeing the rise of North Melbourne. In 1974 played against Richmond in Grand Final, in the following year in 1975 the team lost first four games and became Premiers.

In 1976 beaten by Hawthorn in Grand Final, in 1977 Peter became coach of Tasmania state side then returned to Ovens & Murray League.

After a time in the meat industry took over the Tungamah Hotel. Retiring to Numurkah a couple of years ago.

In retirement works part time with Justice Department working and mentoring inmates at Dhurringile.


 

 

 

Ross Abberfield was guest speaker on Monday 31st July.

Ross was introduced by chairman Frank Malcolm.

Ross is the Goulburn Valley Regional Fruit Fly Coordinator in the Moira, Campaspe, Greater Shepparton, Strathbogie and Berrigan Shires.

Ross was born in Nathalia, joined the Victorian Police retiring in 2011 after 35 years.

Fruit Fly problem became worse with closure of quarantine stations.

Fruit fly is the worlds greatest threat to horticulture.

Australia produces $9B horticultural products a year exporting $4B, with Victoria producing $2.4B of the export market. Costing industry $300M to try and manage.

Sunraysia was pest free, now has had 100 outbreaks.

Victorian Government  funding a $6.7M integrated management effort in Sunraysia, Goulburn-Murray and Yarra Valley districts.

Growers spray trees with commercial applications.

Town growers not inclined to spray fruit trees in backyard. Advice is, if unwilling to manage, remove trees. If choose to manage need to pick, prune, protect. Pick early, prune trees to a manageable size and protect with fruit traps. Fruit traps not the answer as they only tell you that you have fruit fly. To stop flies protect trees with a fine mesh cover and harvest fruit in the middle of the day when the fly is not active. If fruit falls to ground get rid of.

Adult flies are about 7mm long and reddish-brown in colour. Most people discover fruit fly when they cut open their fruit and find it infested with creamy-white maggots.

Female fruit fly has capacity to lay 1000 eggs. The eggs are injected into the fruit and the larvae develop in the fruit leaving the fruit to pupate in soil.

Requires a community effort, not an individual effort to combat the menace.

District Governor Bernie Bott visited the club on 24th July.
 
District Governor Bernie Bott.
Rotary has been a passion and large part of his life, owing a lot to Rotary and those he has met in Rotary.
Came from a family commited to community service and the belief of giving back to the community.
Foundation - asking clubs to give more and offering the opportunity for personal giving.
Membership - membership is the future of Rotary. Club environment of good and proper environment will attract new members.
Legacy - At the end of his year as DG the legacy that he wishes to leave our district is ‘Happy clubs, Happy District’. If we can achieve that by working more collaboratively together, between clubs and across the district, then the exchange of ideas, the friendships created and the goals that we achieve can only lead to happier more engaged Rotarians.
District - value grass roots. District not big brother, it is there to revitalise and support clubs.
Partners Program - Through personal family experience, will support Dermentia foundation and Movember for cancer.
Bernie finished with a challenge. Make sure the ladder is against the right wall to do the right thing in the right way.

 
 
 
 

Carolyn Ryan

Carolyn Ryan proprietor of Cafe@3641 in Strathmerton was guest speaker on Monday 17th July.
Parents started Strathmerton Bakery in 1987.
Carolyn was educated at Numurkah Secondary College with interest in graphic design, but followed passion for cooking by becoming a patrycook. Attended trade school in Melbourne with a class of 129 with only 4 girls.
Parents tried their best to give children best education with family values of determined to be the best.
Grandmothers a huge influence as great role models being community minded. Aunt establishing a similar business was an influence and local influence would be Bernie Ryan.
In 1987 married Michael and have 5 children 23-14 years.
Michael and Caz heavily involved in the community.
4 1/2 years ago started Cafe after 24 years in bakery.
We live in an amazing food bowl producing a great variety of food.
Passion to use local fresh food in menu at Cafe.
High Teas very popular with some flying in from interstate.
130 year old hose restored and garden setting established.
Has been a wonderful journey so far.
Determined to succeed, and work hard to achieve are Carolyn's work ethos.

 
The recipient of the year's Jack Duncan Vocational Service Award was Bernadette Steward.
In presenting the award Vocational Service Director Jeff Buzza said Bernadette is very professional, caring, gentle and always has time for her patients.
Born in Numurkah and educated at St Joseph's and Numurkah Secondary College. Nursing training at Repatriation General Hospital and GV Bas Hospital. Worked at Numurkah War Memorial Hospital as a district nurse then charge sister of general ward for 10 year.
Commenced work at Numurkah Medical Centre 31 years ago as the practice nurse.
She would have treated most people in our community and would know her patients better than many would know themselves.
 
 

 
The recipient of this year's Col McPherson Community Service Award was presented to Isobel Hodge by Melva and Duncan McPherson.
Community Service Director Jacque Phillips in announcing the award said Isobel is a big part of our community who not only embraces her own family with great pride but embraces all aspects of her community with generosity and care for others.
A talented musician Isobel has been Musical Director of Numurkah Singers, founder and musical director of Numurkah and District Choristers for 10 years, musical director of the Numurkah Town Band member of Shepparton Symphony Orchestra. Isobel has a long involvement with disability services , Ladies Probus Club and Numurkah Agricultural Show.
 
 

 
 
 
Club Executives & Directors
President Elect
Treasurer
Secretary
Community Service / Club Projects
Vocational Service / Sergeant
International Service
Immediate Past President
Membership
Public Relations
The Rotary Foundation
New Generations
 
 
Upcoming Events
 
Bulletins