Club Information
Welcome to the Rotary Club of Numurkah website. Here you will be able to learn more about our dynamic Rotary Club.
Numurkah

Service Above Self

We meet In Person
Mondays at 6:30 PM
Numurkah Golf & Bowls Club
Tunnock Road
Numurkah, VIC 3636
Australia
Jacque Phillips CEO NCN Health was guest speaker. NCN moving from COVID reactionary to vaccination. Hesitancy was real but demand increasing. NCN Cobram a vaccination centre able to do 200 per day. G.V. Health centre at McIntosh Centre at Shepparton Showgrounds. For over 50, two jabs, 12 weeks apart. Flu vaccine 2 weeks prior or after.
Under 50 preferred vaccine Pfizer with prioritized vaccination. Under 50 can consent for Astra Venica, an informed personal choice.
NCN Strategic Plan: 1.7% aboriginal or Torres Strait Islanders. 18.3% born overseas. 12.1% language other than English. 47 median age with 25% 65+. Close knit community 74.8% . 7.4% diabetics. 32% obese, 22% smokers. 11.8% experiencing stress. 55% not physical exercise.
Over 3 campuses NCN Health has 116 aged care beds with 95 - 100% occupancy. 34 acute beds with 2 operating theatres.
 
 

 
 
In a nice gesture, Garry McNamara presented each member with a half penny coin, minted in the year of the members birth, which he had fashioned into a key ring. Pictured with Lorraine Greenwood. Thanks Garry.
 

 
 
Garry McNamara acted as chairman and guest speaker.
Left school early and became an apprentice jockey, on becoming too big worked on race courses.
In 1972 called up for National Service, although wanting to drive large vehicles was taught how to cook.
On discharge worked in racing industry in Ballarat for 12 months, then Brisbane for 3 months before enlisting in Army.
Posted to Townsville promoted to Lance Corporal, posted to Portsea for 2 years. Completed a clerk administration course and posted to Army Reserve in Hobart for 2 years and promoted to Sergeant. Next post was Lithgow ammunition's depot. Promoted to Staff Sergeant and posted to Bendigo, promoted to Warrant Officer and posted to Broadmeadows, after 3 years posted to Port Moresby PNG for 2 years.
Promoted to Warrant Officer 2 and posted to Canberra, then Darwin for 2 years in Armored Regiment, finishing in Defence Public Service at Lavington for 4 years.
 
 

 
Chairman John Watson introduced three members who spoke on their vocation.
JUDY McDONALD:
Desired to take up nursing, but not to be, staying home to care for sister. Change of direction with secretarial work, then another change to computerised book-keeping. Husband died of cancer at 57 years. Met Rex Shields, which was interesting and moved to Numurkah. Still doing books for son's business.
Chairman John Watson introduced three members who spoke on their vocation.
CHRIS HARDHAM:
Grew up in Katunga on a dairy farm. Graduated from Bendigo Teachers College, first school Knox Park, brand new but no resources, Yarragon Park before heading off overseas for 12 months. Returned to teaching at Heatherdale, met Ross and moved to Selby. Spent 9 years away from teaching with family, returning to Kalista then 141/2 years at Wandin Yallock before returning home. Relief teaching at Numurkah Secondary College retiring at the end of last year.
 
MICHELLE (SQUISH) DAVID:
Grew up in Western Suburbs of Melbourne, completed Year 12 in 1999, graduated with a Bachelor of Music and Bachelor of Education. In 2005 came to Numurkah as Drama and Music teacher at Numurkah Secondary College, living the first 12 months with Dorothy & Peter Heard. Took 12 months leave returning 3 days and NSC and 2 days Guthrie Street Primary School. Then commenced 5 days at Numurkah Primary School, at present 4 days with 1 day studying Masters of Music Therapy.
Stressed the importance in having children read and engage in conversation. Music Therapy is a tool in mental health, youth and aged care.
 
Love Your Sister featuring Samuel Johnson presented by the Rotary Club of Numurkah with snack box dinner prepared by Numurkah Secondary College students.
 
 
 
 
 

 
Malcolm Watt chair RYPEN - Rotary Youth Program for Enrichment, first became interested in RYPEN a weekend program for young people in 1990. 
Teenagers today benefit greatly from opportunities to develop "life skills" and motivation to help them cope with the challenges of a very competitive future.
Pressure is put on students to perform academically and their results are the benchmark of success. However other skills are needed for the next stage of a student's growth, be that further education or the workplace.
During an intensive residential weekend, young people aged approximately 14 to 16 years will develop increased motivation, improved life skills, better self-image, pride in themselves and an understanding of setting and achieving goals.  At the same time, participants are interacting with peers from different backgrounds, and different parts of our district, improving their teamwork skills and having fun!!  All this done in an informal atmosphere, where questions and debates are encouraged.
Waranga Basin was the venue for the weekend camps from 1991 to 1995. Now in its 31st year, and 27th year at Lake Nihacoote.
This year 21 students from 12 clubs attended, with incredible feedback.
 
Chairman Allen read a letter from Nathan, one of two students sponsored by the Rotary Club of Numurkah.
Learnt so many new skills, try everything and teamwork. Rock climbing wall a challenge, made new friends, thoroughly enjoyed the camp, only dislike was leaving.
 

 
 
 
Lesley Hills, born in Yorkshire, nearly a "local" after 27 years in Deniliquin. In 1991 spent a year in Sydney, returning 18 months later to a dairy farm in Blighty.
Three years ago fell in love with yoga and trained as a Laughter Yoga Leader. Has sessions at two aged care facilities, a pre-school and a community group, youngest 3 years, oldest 103 years.
Multitude of health benefits from laughter exercises. 10 minutes of continuous laughter equivalent of 30 minutes on a rowing machine. Laughter for health and wellbeing improves mental and physical health, lowers stress levels, improves lung capacity and regulates blood pressure.
 
 
 
 
 

 
DIVERSE CREATIVITY ON DISPLAY
 
The 41st Annual Art & Craft Exhibition was officially opened by Rotary District Governor Bruce Anderson, who congratulated the Rotary Club of Numurkah for staging an excellent exhibition.
The art judge, Geoff Paynter, commented on the diversity, creativity and the technical abilities displayed by the artists.
Geoff announced the winners in each section he had selected with comments on the artwork.
Best in Show was awarded to Tim Redfern from Mulwala, “Jukaliatas”, “Large, impressive image with an interesting interchange of shape and line, based on natural forms”, were Geoff’s comments.
Runner Up was “Impression” by Sally Sidebottom from Tallygaroopna. Geoff commented “Spontaneous feel to this painting, strong contrasts with shape and colour”.
Best Watercolour awarded to Be Gosler  with “Fun in the Sun”, “Creative interpretation, good use of watercolour medium”.
Best Oil was “Tranquil Autumn” by Do Noble from Doveton. Geoff’s comments “Reads well, good impression, with soft use of colour”.
Best Pastel awarded to Linda Finch from Donvale with “Waiting for a Friend”. “Great use of pastel - broad in application. Subject based, which carries well”.
Best Acrylic was “summer Waratahs” by Melanie Jamieson from Finley.
Best Pencil was awarded to “Leucadendron” by Louise Adams from Temora. “ A creative image with excellent execution”.
Best Regional Artist was Janet Tett from Yarrawonga with Mystic Mountains”. “Great overall in use of colour and creative interpretation”.
Moira Arts & Culture Inc. Encouragement Award was awarded to Victor Casha from Cobram with “Playing Hide & Seek”. “Technically well done with a sentimental attachment”.
Photographic Award was awarded to Dennis Rickard from Numurkah with “Patterns”. “Great contrast, with natural patterns.”
Claire Reid was the craft judge stating precise skill was very evident – the entries were judged on the skill of the craftsperson, not just their aesthetic qualities. Claire also noted contributors to the show continue to display ever improving skills.
The winners were:
Fibres.Threads and Beads Award was awarded to Margaret Blackburn from Burramine South with a mauve crochet beaded milk jug cover. “This piece is exquisitely delicate and precise”.
Quilt Award was awarded to Ann Fagan from Katunga. Tribute to William. The quilt is a tribute
 To William a fabric and furnishings designer. Ann has used elements of his designs with close attention to detail in maintaining points and seam intersections.
Craft Award was awarded to Vita Janssens from Koonoomoo with “Violet China Painted Plate”. “A delicate combination of back and foreground elements as well as a subtle wash”.
Best Craft Entry was awarded to Ann Fagan for her quilt “Tribute to William”.
Chairman of the Art & Craft Committee of the Rotary Club of Numurkah said “the club was incredibly pleased with the standard of work on display and the attendance numbers during the weekend. A team effort from members ensured the exhibition was such a success under COVID requirements”.
 
 
 
 
 
Peter Heard spoke to the club on "The Worlds' Longest Taxi Fare" an account of his grandfathers brother Charlie Heard driving Miss Ada Beal and two companions to Darwin and back in 1930.
Charlie Heard was born in Rochester and at 18 served with AIF in France, settled in Geelong in 1928 and established a taxi business in 1930 with a Hudson tourer.
Accepting the fare, Charlie modified the car by fitting extra tanks for petrol and water, spare parts and coconut matting.
Departed June 30, ladies had shopping excursions at every stop. In Port August Charlie fitted extra springs, staying overnight at hotels, stations or set up camp. Charlie had organised petrol to be at designated spots during the trip, and used a compass to keep on course. 
By the time they reached Alice Springs, people had heard, by bush telegraph, of the excursion, and came out to greet them.
Katherine to Darwin usually undertaken by rail, but Charlie decided to continue by car. Reached Darwin with hot baths and comfortable beds. After several days commenced return trip via Brisbane and Sydney.
On fifth day reached NT, Queensland border, then onto Brisbane and the east coast. Travelling along the Pacific Highway to Sydney Final leg through Gippsland to Melbourne and Geelong.
The Hudson weighed 3 tons, travelled 7,003 miles, used 505 gallons of petrol and only had one puncture over the trip lasting 3 months.
Out of proceeds Charlie purchased a garage, passing away in 1951.
 

 
GEOFF LIMNER & BRUCE MCEWAN from the Rotary Club of Box Hill Central spoke on "Operation Cleft" which provides free cleft lip and cleft palate repair surgery for underprivileged children in Bangladesh.
More than 5,000 children are born with  cleft lip or cleft palate each year. Through the generous support of Rotary Clubs, over 12,000 cleft repair surgeries since inception of the program in 2005.
Geoff presented Paul Harris Fellowships to John Watson and Linda Watson for their generous support of the program.

 
Wilow Hoskin told of her "most amazing" year in Finland as a Rotary Exchange Student.
Using a power point and video presentation Wilow showed pictures of her 12 months in Finland.
Lived in a town of 8,000 with two host families.
Due to COVID could not undertake much travel, but visited Lapland in winter, ice-sating and skiing, -18 degrees. Visited again in summer, no snow but hiked.
Summer sun does not set, winter sun does not rise.
Schools are set up for 3 year levels. Attended a traditional high school dance, similar to our deb balls,
Favorite food: reindeer soup, blueberry pie, bread cheese & cloudberries, black pudding.

 
Jeff Blackley, president of the Numurkah Historical Society was guest speaker.
The Numurkah Historical Society has been part of the Numurkah Community since 1964.
The vision of the Historical Society is to be a vibrant welcoming organisation committee to preserve artefacts and records of the past for current and future generations.
Using a power point display Jeff showed artefacts and links to the past providing background stories.
  • Aim: To collect, store and/or display and use for research.
  • Society is a Public Records of Victoria Place of Deposits.
  • Record interviews with older members of the community provide insight into our past.
  • Window into History collate artefacts to share our history.
  • Share specific research information with public.
At the moment: stocktaking, digitising of the collection, labelling of display items, regular change of displays with more permanent displays in other rooms, permanent record of our servicemen, opening up of the breezeway to the public, setting up a railway pergola, opening up a tool shed.
How you can help: visit, spread the word, donate items, join the Society, helping with displays or cataloguing.
History is about people, locations and artefacts etc, used to tell the story of people and how they lived and interacted.
 

 
Rotary members met at the Numurkah Cemetery for a Cemetery Walk led by Bernadette Steward, secretary of the Numurkah Wunghnu Cemetery Trust.
The evening commenced with a BBQ.
Numurkah Cemetery established in 1883 and has 8,000 graves. In 1978 Lawn Cemetery established, which is nearly full, but trend is towards cremation.
Community consultation to be held on future expansion and development.
Right of Interment Holder has say on use of plot and erection of memorial.
Role of Trust at funerals to ensure correct person is being buried. During COVID ensure capacity restrictions and recording of attendees.
Bernadette then led a walk through the cemetery with fascinating stories of the graves, particularly those relating to the early history of Numurkah, with one unannounced visitor.
 
 
 

 

In lieu of a regular meeting Rotary Club members provided the BBQ at the Numurkah Australia Day Celebrations.

Photos courtesy Mark McNamara.

 
 
 
 

Traditional first meeting of the year combined with Lions Club at Numurkah Bowls Club.

Lions Club president Keith Nicholl welcomed members, wishing all a happy new year.

A delicious meal was served by the Lions Club, in a relaxed evening of fellowship.

 
 
 

 

 
 
 
Entry forms for the Rotary Club of Numurkah 41st Annual Arts & Craft Exhibition are now available.
Offering $10,000 in prize money the exhibition will be staged in the Numurkah Town Hall from Friday 5th March to Monday  8th March.
Entry forms have been posted to last year's exhibitors and are available from the Numurkah Visitor Information Centre and Numurkah Library, and Cobram Visitor Information Centre.
Forms can also be found on the club's Facebook page and Website.
Exhibition subject to Sate COVID-19 restrictions and directives.
 
 
 
 
 

 
Glorious weather, excellent  company and a delicious gourmet dinner prepared by Gary Phillips, Geoff Holmes an Fay Holmes with salads and desserts supplied by members, made for a fitting climax to a year like no other.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Robyn Sprunt Manager Primary Health and Catherine Church Director of Clinical Services from NCN Health Numurkah on local experience with COVID-19.
Community Testing Clinic:
  • Daily testing of symptomatic clients. Over 1,000 tests since June.
  • Re-usable masks, 4,000  distributed to vulnerable community members.
  • Shepparton outbreak 14th October testing team supported Shepparton.
Communication is the key:
  • Clear and concise messaging.
  • CEO daily updates.
  • Department huddles.
  • Letters to clients.
  • Phone calls to clients.
  • Facebook information..
  • Information sessions at local pharmacies and pamphlets and information in stores,
Impact on Community:
  • Increase in anxiety, fear and worry.
  • Increase incident of mental health issues.
  • Increase in family violence.
  • Decrease in routine health screening.
  • Less theatre presentations.
  • Increase in social isolation.
Continued service and support:
  • All services have been maintained.
  • Alternate models of care - telehealth.
Group based activities:
  • All group based activities ceased.
  • Alternate models of care explored.
  • Clients more socially isolated.
  • Increase in mental health concerns.
  • Increase in support - counselling/psychology.
Supporting the community:
  • Food hampers.
  • Newspaper deliveries.
  • Blood test in the home.
  • Flu vaccination in community.
  • Linking clients with services.
Moving to COVID Normal:
  • Group based services return.
  • Increase in face to face service.
  • Visiting outreach services.
Aged Care:
  • Visitors return.
  • Outings recommenced.
  • Group activities recommenced.
  • Volunteer program recommence.
Mental health and wellbeing:
  • Caring for both residents and staff.
  • Balancing new normal.
  • Daily screening of residents.
  • Monthly COVID swabbing of staff.
  • Outbreak management plans in place.
 
 
 

 
The AGM of the Numurkah Rotary Club was chaired by Gary Phillips.
Election of office bearers for 2021-2022 by ballot.
  • President: Gary Phillips
  • Secretary: Jennifer Rodger
  • Treasurer: Jeff Buzza.
 

 
 
Sonia Strahan Prostrate Cancer Specialist Nurse with G.V. Health as guest speaker.
Position funded by the "Biggest Blokes Lunch" a fundraiser for men's health which has grown from 90 to 700 attendees over the years.
After 15 years as a palliative care nurse Sonia in 2014 took on the role of Prostate Cancer Specialist Nurse based in the Peter Copulus Cancer and  Wellness Centre at G.V. Health.
Looking after men being diagnosed and treated for prostate cancer.
Men when diagnosed know little about the disease. The nurse ensures patients are well-informed about their diagnosis and treatment opportunities. Patients have a high level of anxiety and stress, a nurse is in an optimum position to support the men and their partners by providing information on treatment and become primary point of contact.
Estimated 220.000 living with prostate cancer with only 16,000 diagnosed. Early diagnosis essential as 3,000 dying each year.
Service provides coordinated approach to pre and post operative care locally whilst surgery in Melbourne. Have good working relationship with Melbourne hospitals. 
With another nurse appointed, now cover every day of the week.
Implore men to have yearly check ups with their local G.P.

 
Cathy Booth, spoke on her founding of Umoja Orphanage in Kenya.
Started from nothing, in 2011 holidaying in Kenya was impacted by the poverty and the need for a children's home, returned three times before purchasing 15 acres of land after many meetings in Kenya.
134 volunteers, mostly Rotarians, backbone of project, raising money step by step.
Except for houses, everything built by volunteers. First structure was a caretaker's house in 2014 commenced building the first house, which was finished and ready to receive children in 2016. In 2018 commenced fundraising for second house, a family home, not a dormitory.
Orphanage is involved with community assisting in medical treatment and workshops in agriculture.
Proceeds from farm cattle and chickens and vegetable gardens providing funds for orphanage.
Children have been abandoned or sexually abused and chosen by Government Department to attend orphanage.
Last year drought followed by floods lost crops. COVID-19 Safari Business had no clients, sponsorship decreased.
Seeking contributions towards second home and sponsorship of children. Slowly the farm is recovering and able to sell harvest.
In Kenya every 15 seconds a child is orphaned, with 2 million orphans. Vulnerability of orphaned children to abuse.
Pride in staff.
"We are achieving the extraordinary".
 
Chairman John Watson with guest speaker Cathy Booth via Zoom frpm Queensland.
 

 
 
Colleen O'Hara spoke on The School of St Jude in Tanzania.
Gemma Sisia graduated with a Dip. Ed. in Armidale NSW and in 1995 flew to Uganda and on safari to Tanzania. Returning home Gemma opened a bank account to pay for the education of a student, then with donations from Rotary started a East Africa Fund.
In 2002, opened The School of St Jude with 3 students and a big dream to provide a free, high quality education to children living in poverty. Today St Jude's is a pioneering leader in charitable education within Africa, educating 1,800 students across three primary and secondary campuses,  achieving among the top results in the region, and support hundreds of graduates through tertiary education.
In Tanzania 74% of children will not be enrolled in secondary education, an adult averages 5.8 years of schooling.
70% of the population live on les than $2 a day with over 12 million Tanzanians living in poverty. Education can lift an entire population out of poverty, creating stable and growing economies. For every year of education a child receives, their adult earnings can increase by an average of 10%.
80% 0f St Jude's graduates' families overcome extreme poverty.
St Jude's empower their students to transform their community, challenge the status quo and find solutions for the 12 million Tanzanians living in poverty.
 
 

 
 
Josh Brear currently working with Australian Border Force as an Inspector. Role to inspect border cargo and people providing security for Australia, acting as a "gatekeeper".
In 1990 joined the Air Force for ten years before joining maritime security, monitoring cargo, cargo vessels and crews entering Australia.
In 2015 ABF evolved from Custom service providing coast watch and maritime surveillance.
ABF functions 24/7 co-operating with other agencies such as Department of Defense and supporting law enforcement agencies under Home Affairs.
Duties include collection of excise for Commonwealth.
Government policy changes means adaptation of policy on the run, not without challenge.
Focus getting people and cargo in and out of the country, holding, detention or allow people to arrive.
Not without risk, with intelligence push risk out with a more considered approach.
COVID-19 has thrown up challenges.
 

 
District Secretary Chris Sutton presented a Silver Presidential Citation to Past President Lorraine Greenwood acknowledging the achievements of the Rotary Club of Numurkah during Lorraine's year as President.
 

 
Rotary Club of Numurkah meeting 12th October was held in person at the Numurkah Golf & Bowls Club and also on Zoom.
 
 

 
Jenny Green lost her 26 year old daughter to suicide. Not wanting other families to suffer as she did the Rock It Foundation was formed.
The Rock It Foundation, helps those in need of immediate psychiatric treatment by paying for their psych appointments right away instead of being on the public systems waitlist potentially causing a lot more pain.
As her daughters passion was pole dancing a fundraising gala is organised.
This pole dancing extravaganza is in memory of Jacklyn Louise Williams, who on September 28th 2017 took her own life. Jacklyn was an extremely talented dancer and in honour of her, multiple dancers from all across Victoria came together to put on a show to raise funds for the Rock It Foundation.
The aim is to raise awareness of mental health and stop suicide.
Jenny asked members to make time to ask are you OK. Covid is making people go into their shells with no interaction. Step into their shoes for a day and be there for them.
 
 

 
t’s been a long time between drinks for the members of the Rotary Club of Numurkah who are meeting outdoors at the Golf Club tonight.. With COVID-19 restrictions the Golf Club can accommodate 10 indoors or 50 outdoors. The staff at the Golf Club were excellent hosts.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
Celebrating "Lift the Lid" Mad Hat day for mental health, Leah Farnham from Headspace in Shepparton was guest speaker.
Leah Farnham has an eight year involvement with Headspace Shepparton which works with 12 - 25 year olds providing early intervention.
1 in 5 youth experience a health issue: Anxiety 15-20%. Substance Misuse 10%, Depression 7%.
Impact of poor mental health: Poor school or work attendance, Social withdrawal or isolation. Adopting negative coping strategies.
Adolescence a period of great change. change in the way we think, change in relationships, change in the way we feel.
Normal for adolescents to argue for sake of arguing, jump to conclusions, be self-centred, constantly find fault in adults, be overly dramatic.
Signs of depression: unexplained or prolonged feelings of sadness, sadness or anger, mood swings,  change in behaviour.
Headspace is youth friendly looking after physical health, mental health, alcohol and drug dependence, vocation and education.
Managed by G.V. Health, only address mild to moderate conditions, valuing youth and family involvement.
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
Josh West was born to parents addicted to drugs, adopted by foster parents at 6 months.
Suffering Asperger's Syndrome picked on at school. Met grand parents at 18 years
Commenced playing basketball at 19 years, had tried other sports but basketball became his passion, playing with Australian Paralympic Team, Australian Boomerangs. Team members are able bodied but with intellectual disabilities. Captain of the team has travelled the world, Japan, America, South America, Turkey and Italy.
Team is not sponsored, all paid from own pocket. Basketball has changed his life, giving him focus and meeting some wonderful friends.
Now coaching, plays several days a week and trains in Melbourne 5 - 7 times a year when allowed. Zoom training during COVID.
Success in life goes back to foster parents who gave him a second chance at life.
 
 

 

As guest speaker Geoff Holmes conducted an entertaining quiz from recent articles featured in the Numurkah Leader. 

Winners received prizes from Geoff's vegetable garden.

 
 

 
 
GUEST SPEAKER: ALICE GLACHEN:
Alice  a member of the Rotary Club of Albury Hume, Director of Capital Fundraising Campaign for Albury Hilltop Accommodation Centre, part of Fight Cancer Campaign.
Hilltop providing motel style accommodation for regional cancer patients.
Background, grew up in a Rotary family, an exchange student then followed father as a Rotarian. Husband and herself owned Beacon Lighting in Albury and served as Mayor of Albury. Following sale of business joined Hilltop as Fundraising Director.
Planned December launch, then bushfires, then when smoke settles COVID, cancelling media events.
Need for accommodation for regional community, over $1M raised during the planning of Stage 1 which is now complete. Cost $5,122,129, budget $5,400.00.
Large rooms providing sanctuary and safety in comfortable quality rooms. A home away from home. Caters for all ages, space for children, library, community board room.
Over 56,000 room nights available, over 2,700 families assisted, occupancy now nearing capacity.
32 Local Government Areas in footprint with Moira #1 user.
Stage 2 in planning with additional 10 suites, library and quiet room, gymnasium. laundry, an additional admin. area.
Stage 2 Cost & Funding. Cost $3,808,000, Commonwealth Government $1,904,000, Cash on hand $1,134.796, with a shortfall of $769,204.
Preliminary planning for stage 3.
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
Trudi Pratt guest speaker.
Trudi Pratt Emergency Management with City of Greater Shepparton and Moira Shire, responsible for emergency planning and relief.
Background as a trained nurse and a soldier.
Covid pandemic not a typical emergency such as flood, fire and wind events. Covid an unseen enemy.
Moira Shire spread over a large area without vast congregation of people thus not compacted by Covid, with only one case, which was someone out of town.
Typical day, attend meetings and planning if an out break, Understanding legislation from two states.
Sate border shut down causes no end of problems with permits.
Preparing for a Class 1 or Class 2 Emergency involves planning evacuation and movement of people to ensure safety with closure of channels or roads and the setting up of relief centres.
Meeting with local organisations with need to listen and engage with local people.
Advance warning of installation and test of temporary levees at Nathalia for maintenance. SES volunteers trained in sand bagging.

 
D.G. Bruce ensured the club he  will try and visit in person, prioritising those not visited in person.
  • District Conference current plan is Wangaratta March 18-20. Options include a May date or Conference with District Handover if unable to proceed.
  • Baton Relay to celebrate 100 years of Rotary in Australia and New Zealand. If unable to proceed will pass on to AG to reach each club.
  • District project to celebrate 100 years of Rotary is an immunisation campaign in the Pacific Region.
  • Membership levels discussed with reasons for decline from 44 to 35, mental health, expecting too much, not educating members, business commitments, death and age. Bruce commented harder to keep everyone engaged and active in larger clubs.
  • District to revamp programs such as RLI with introduction of a Basic Introduction to Rotary, which would be less confronting to new members, with RLI for more experienced members.
  • Review of club; good emphasis on youth, community, website. Club in good shape,
  • Constitution and By-Laws are comprehensive, keep up to date.
  • Role of District is to help clubs to do what they do best.
 
 
 
Marilyn introduced the "Partners Project"
Partners Project - Rotarians Against Malaria.
Mascot "Aussie the Mozzie".
To mark 100 years of Rotary in Australia and New Zealand publish a booklet celebrating achievement of each club with short history and a current picture of club, with a project to mark R100 in community.
 
 
 

 

Another innovative and entertaining meeting organised by President Jennifer.

A virtual tour of Werribee Open Range Zoo with our guide taking members on a drive through the park, describing the animals encountered.

Tour prompted much conversation from members regarding the animals later in the meeting.

 
 

 
CHAIR: MICHELLE SQUISH DAVIS:
Squish began the night with a musical quiz, "Name the Tune". the tunes played on her melodica.
The members were then divided into "Break-out Rooms".
Room #1 Chris Hardham, Ross, Lou, Terry and John
Update on members activities including ladder accidents.
Room #2 Gary, Ivan, Jennifer and Kate.
Talked rubbish!
Room #3 Allen, Chris Sutton and Rex.
Poems and music. "Don't worry everything going to be alright". Kate quoted a poem by Tammy Muir and Chris sang a song with her ukulele .
Room #4 Sally, Lorraine and Stephen.
Lorraine quoted from "Tale of Two Cities" by Charles Dickens.
"It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way—in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only"
 
Link to Tammy Muir's poem as quoted by Kate.
 
 
 
 

 
The Club Assembly held via zoom on Monday 3rd August was an opportunity to talk about moving forward within the confines we are in.
 
 
 

 
 
Nicole Wells community Development Officer with NCN Health was guest speaker at zoom meeting.
Difficult to access farming community with current restrictions as support services unable to undertake face to face consultations.
Women are home schooling as well as farm duties, and farmers will not access support until too late. Nicole wishing to work with community groups to be more innovative and proactive.
Farmers first to lend a hand to neighbours, hope to build on this to help themselves.
Farmers are not doing well with depression, stress, high anxiety and transitioning to other fields as worn down.
Hope to build capacity to resilience with conversation to help themselves and family.
A case by case as go through intake to access financial and mental health then to link with relevant consultants.
 
 
 

 

At two months, son Ned tested positive to Down Syndrome. A scary time, but further tests showed no issues with heart.

Ned brought an enormous amount of joy to the family.

In 2014 decided to organise a bike ride to create awareness on World Down Syndrome Day 2st March.

Many offers of help from friends keen to ride, with a parents support car.

With 3 weeks notice organised ride from Cobram to Mulwala, Yarrawonga, Chiltern, Wangaratta, Benalla, Shepparton, Numurkah Cobram. BBQ at finish to celebrate. Encouraged to make it an annual event. Now riding the route in reverse in order to avoid strong head winds. Raised over $17,000 for Cobram Special School and Down Syndrome.

Established a Facebook page 321 Ride for Down Syndrome.

On a personal note after 23 years in munitions manufacture became Business Services Manager for PALS, supporting others with needs.

 

 

Bernadette Steward secretary of the Numurkah Wunghnu Cemetery Trust gave an interesting talk on the history of Numurkah and the Numurkah Cemetery.
Wunghnu Cemetery established in 1879 and contains graves of Numurkah residents before the Numurkah Cemetery was established in 1883.
Entrance erected in 1909, and recently refurbished.
The Numurkah Lawn Cemetery was created in 1978, with enough ground for 3 years before expansion required.
Bernadette organises "Cemetery Walks" illustrating the history of the cemetery and its past residents.
Photos of Numurkah 1888 were shown.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

CLUB CHANGEOVER MEETING 29th JUNE 2020

The Rotary Club of Numurkah Changeover Dinner for 2020, held at the Numurkah Golf Club was a changeover with a difference.
Due to COVID-19 limit restrictions only the previous board members and the incoming board members attended, with other club members joining the meeting by Zoom.
 
 
 
President Lorraine Greenwood delivered her President's Address Annual Report outlining the activities for the year.
 
 
Community Service Director Julie Andrew presented the Col McPherson Community Service Award to Adam Drust.
 
 
Vocational Service Director Sally Rose presented the Jack Duncan Vocational Service Award to Anna Corazza.
 
 
President Lorraine presented the President's Award to A.G. Chris Sutton.
 
 
Incoming President Jennifer Rodger was inducted at 2020-2021 President by A.G. Chris Sutton.
 
 
Incoming President Jennifer Rodger oulined her vision for the club.
 
 
President Jennifer introduced the 2020-2021 Board.
 
 
 

 
 
Tinja Nakki Farewell.
The Rotary Club of Numurkah held a farewell for exchange student Tinja Nakki at the home of Kylie & Wayne Jackson. Tinja from Finland has spent the last 12 months with the Rotary Club as a Rotary Exchange Student.
Kate Hodge on behalf of the club spoke on the delight of having Tinja with us for the last 12 months and thanked the host families Renee, Bruce and Tenille for the first six months and Kylie Wade and Cody for the last six months.
Both families expressed the pleasure they had in welcoming Tinja into their homes and families.
Due to COVID-19 restrictions Tinja missed out on many events and experiences, but assured all she was returning home, not thinking of the experiences she missed, but the experiences she enjoyed.
Tinja's personality and charm delighted all she met, and was a wonderful ambassador of Finland and the Rotary Youth Exchange program.
The club wish Tinja all the best in her life's journey.
 
 
 

 
Suggested and organised by President Lorraine, the club held several dinner parties, hosted by club members with small numbers attending.
19 Rotarians attended plus 5 partners. The hosts were Terry and Pam, Judy and Rex, Phil and Fiona, and Lorraine.
An enjoyable evening was had by all members who participated, as the photos show.
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
Leanne Rawson spoke via Zoom on the concept of a Numurkah parkrun.
Event is for whole family, started in England in 2004 and Australia in 2011.
Leanne explained she was a single mother and a P.E. teacher at St Mary of the Angels.
Ex runner and Little Athletics coach
Investigated a Numurkah parkrun over 2 to 3 years.
Reasons for Numurkah, Love of Exercise, Location, Fitness, Social and Obesity issues.
Why? Create a healthier and happier activity, Inclusive fun, Different way to stay active, Free community led social focus, Prams children and dogs on leads allowed and wheelchair accessibility.
Held in a public open space.
Not a race, 5km event for walkers, joggers, runners and spectators.
Event would start on a Saturday at 8am finishing at 9am with option of post event coffee and catch up.
Start date TBC, June 22nd the earliest.
Would commence in Rose Gardens, across wooden bridge along walking track to steel bridge then to carpark, back to Kinnairds Road then return to Rose Gardens.
Registration online, once registered can do any event anywhere.
Cost of $7,500 to establish event, covers all expenses for establishing for lifetime of event and AED defibrillator.
Volunteers required, five from Rotary for first 2 months.

 
President Elect Jennifer Rodger was guest speaker at the club's Zoom meeting. Using a Power point presentation Jennifer revealed the results of the online survey of members and her plans for the next Rotary Year,
There was a positive result to meetings and content, with improvement in planning, involvement and monitoring of members highlighted.
More social and fun activities with more local community service projects with closer communication were also highlighted in the responses
Jennifer then detailed her plans for activities next Rotary year.
 
 

 
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